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677

Avg. panel size for providers w/ 200+ patients

35%

YOY growth in DPC clinic locations

49

States with at least one DPC practice

What is Direct Primary Care?

Direct Primary Care practices charge a flat recurring membership fee instead of billing insurance.

Practice medicine your way

Offer the medical services and patient experience that match your hippocratic values.

Escape fee-for-service

Free yourself from the vicious cycle of long hours and absurd requirements imposed by your FFS overlords.

Love being a doctor

Smaller panels ensure you have plenty of time for yourself and your patients.

Help your community

Make high-quality primary care accessible for the uninsured and under-insured members of your community.

Download the definitive guide to DPC

• Achieving the Quad-Aims with DPC
• Implementation models
• Benefits for Patients, Physicians, & Employers
• And much, much more

Download

Pure DPC vs. Hybrid DPC

The two most common implementations of the DPC model are "Pure" and "Hybrid." Pure DPCs do not bill insurance for any patients. Hybrid practices have a mix of DPC and fee-for-service patients.

Compare

‘Pure’ DPC

Popular with new practices.

PROS

+Total freedom from fee-for-service

+More rewarding doctor-patient relationships

+Maximize time with patients

+Keep panel sizes small

+Lower labor costs

+Simplified clinical and administrative workflows

CONS

Can take longer to build a sustainable business

Expect a drop in revenue if converting from fee-for-service

Requires an investment to grow memberships

Hybrid DPC

Popular with practices that are transitioning from FFS to DPC.

PROS

+Little impact to short-term revenue

+Keep all your patients as you slowly convert to DPC

+Allows more time to fully transition to DPC

CONS

Higher clinical and administrative overhead costs

Need to maintain two billing systems

Still dealing with insurance companies

Harder to ensure DPC patients have a high-quality experience

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Dr. Brieanna Seefeldt explains why her affiliation with the Nextera Healthcare Community is a win-win partnership.

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Dr. Brieanna Seefeldt explains why her affiliation with the Nextera Healthcare Community is a win-win partnership.

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Dr. Brieanna Seefeldt explains why her affiliation with the Nextera Healthcare Community is a win-win partnership.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

How is DPC different than Concierge medicine?

While both DPC and concierge medicine have memberships, two main differences are:

1. DPC practices design and price their memberships to be affordable and widely accessible while Concierge practices focus on serving higher income subset of patients.

2. Concierge practices take insurance payments in addition to their membership fees. DPC practices don’t take insurance at all.

What about insurance? Do patients still need it?

While both DPC and concierge medicine have memberships, two main differences are:

1. DPC practices design and price their memberships to be affordable and widely accessible while Concierge practices focus on serving higher income subset of patients.

2. Concierge practices take insurance payments in addition to their membership fees. DPC practices don’t take insurance at all.

What should I include in my DPC memberships?

While both DPC and concierge medicine have memberships, two main differences are:

1. DPC practices design and price their memberships to be affordable and widely accessible while Concierge practices focus on serving higher income subset of patients.

2. Concierge practices take insurance payments in addition to their membership fees. DPC practices don’t take insurance at all.

Who uses direct primary care? What types of patients will I have?

While both DPC and concierge medicine have memberships, two main differences are:

1. DPC practices design and price their memberships to be affordable and widely accessible while Concierge practices focus on serving higher income subset of patients.

2. Concierge practices take insurance payments in addition to their membership fees. DPC practices don’t take insurance at all.

How do patients get labs, prescriptions, inpatient service and other things I don't provide?

While both DPC and concierge medicine have memberships, two main differences are:

1. DPC practices design and price their memberships to be affordable and widely accessible while Concierge practices focus on serving higher income subset of patients.

2. Concierge practices take insurance payments in addition to their membership fees. DPC practices don’t take insurance at all.